Invasion Coast

Visiting Sussex History

Visiting Sussex History

In the footsteps of medieval monks A group of a dozen museum members enjoyed a fascinating trip on Tuesday, 11th July, to Lewes Priory,  led by Graham Mayhew,   author of   The Monks of Saint Pancras – Lewes Priory, England’s Premier Cluniac Monastery and its Dependencies 1076-1537. The ruins of the 11th century Priory … read more …

First posted in Featured, Invasion Coast, Local History Research, Past Events on 17th July 2017
Last updated: 22nd July 2017
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What do you know about the Bayeux Tapestry?

What do you know about the Bayeux Tapestry?

One of the Museum’s most admired speakers is Imogen Corrigan, a freelance lecturer in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval History and Art. As the many who attended her illustrated talk on The Bayeux Tapestry on May 11th can attest, it was a perfect blend of information and entertainment: fast-paced enlightenment on panel details, well peppered with laughter-inducing … read more …

First posted in Featured, Invasion Coast on 13th May 2017
Last updated: 15th May 2017



Digging Up History

Digging Up History

Digging up new facts on history:  Conference on The Plague of 1665 7th November: East Street Museum This is the featured photo from the RyeNews article  on a fascinating day at the East Street Museum written by Seana Lanigan.  Click here for the full account — then you’ll probably want to go on to the … read more …

First posted in Featured, Invasion Coast, Surrounding Towns and Villages on 15th November 2015
Last updated: 15th November 2015



Between Rye and Kent

Between Rye and Kent

Dr Geoffrey Mead of the University of Sussex gave a lively talk Thursday night, November 12th, on the landscape East of Rye. Though many people think of Rye as directly bordering Kent, there’s a unique sliver of Sussex before the county line that is interesting both for its geography and its history. Originally part of … read more …

First posted in Featured, Invasion Coast, Maritime Rye, Surrounding Towns and Villages on 13th November 2015
Last updated: 13th November 2015



Rye’s Waterloo Expert

Rye’s Waterloo Expert

Chris Viner and a partial glimpse of  battle scenes leading up to Waterloo. What a spellbinding account of the Battle of Waterloo we received last Thursday, October 8th at our East Street Museum, from a recognized world expert on Napoleon, who happens to live in Rye. Chris Viner (Soldiers of Rye, on the High Street) … read more …

First posted in Featured, Invasion Coast, Notable People on 12th October 2015
Last updated: 13th October 2015



Waterloo: Talk Oct 8th: Chris Viner

Waterloo: Talk Oct 8th: Chris Viner

The special Waterloo Exhibition continues and Chris Viner is our next speaker  —  on Napoleon!   Thursday, 8h October 7:30, East Street The special exhibition mounted for the duration of the Rye Arts Festival will remain at East Street for most of October and may be viewed during the next weekends.  Chris Viner’s model soldiers depicting … read more …

First posted in East Street Posts, Events Diary, Invasion Coast, Rye Buildings and Defences on 17th September 2015
Last updated: 30th September 2015



Found any antiquities lately?

Found any antiquities lately?

Our Latest Talk: The Portable Antiquities Scheme, : Finds in Kent and East Sussex by Jennifer Jackson. Tuesday 11th November Pictured is one of the Kent finds featured in a presentation by Jennifer during the 2014 Festival of Archaeology.  It is a small, early Medieval gold pendant  in the shape of a three-dimensional animal head, … read more …

First posted in Invasion Coast, Local History Research, News, Surrounding Towns and Villages on 12th November 2014
Last updated: 8th January 2015



More on Medieval Rye

More on Medieval Rye

Rye was once an island and has always been a port. The Romans exported iron from Rye. Over the years it emerged as a port of increasing importance. It was involved in fishing, shipbuilding, trade:- fish, timber, wool, wine, luxury goods. . . . Rye was a royal dockyard and shipyard, the naval base for … read more …

First posted in Invasion Coast, Rye Buildings and Defences, Rye Streets, Rye Town History on 13th October 2014
Last updated: 20th April 2017



Norman and Medieval Times: 1066-1485

Norman and Medieval Times: 1066-1485

by Jo Kirkham 1066 King Edward the Confessor died on 5 January 1066 and Harold was crowned King on 6 January 1066. William the Conqueror landed at Pevensey with 400 large and 1000 small ships on 28th September 1066. This area of coast between Rye and Hastings and inland to include Brede (the Manor of … read more …

First posted in Featured, Invasion Coast on 8th October 2014
Last updated: 9th October 2014
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Tales of threats to Rye – and why we’re still here (May 14th talk)

Tales of threats to Rye – and why we’re still here (May 14th talk)

Somehow Rye escaped every time! On Tuesday evening, May 14th,  at the East Street Museum, our Chairman, historian Jo Kirkham  bundled solid research, graphic description of invasions foiled and failed, and apt and amusing quotes from the times into what one listener accurately  described as a tour de forcc,  bringing alive 2000 years of perpetual threat to … read more …

First posted in Invasion Coast, News, Past Talks on 15th May 2013
Last updated: 5th July 2013